I absolutely have experienced many turns and twists, mostly in my gut, with regards to blogging. First, I fretted over the platform I used. Was it cute enough? Then, I decided I didn’t want it to be cute. I wanted it to be professional. So, I left the cutesy blog. See exhibit 1, and created this blog.

When I first created this blog, I was motivated. Then, summer was over and work started. Now, I had an excuse. I didn’t need an excuse because I couldn’t find the time. I’ve always needed to write to reflect. The excuse I could fake was that I had no time when really it was the fear of do I have anything to offer?

Aaron shared this video with us which compares wonderfully to blogging. The one line that resonated with me most was when the girl tells the boy, “Why are you scared? You’ve jumped from five feet. How is this different?” It’s so true. I’ve written before and shared with a small group. What’s the difference when I share it online? And, I mean really, it’s not like millions of people actually even know your posts are out there. Since we are using this analogy to compare diving to blogging, let’s talk about the feeling you can only get when you dive from higher up. Although it is so scary at first, it is truly much more fun.a

https://static01.nyt.com/video/players/offsite/index.html?videoId=100000004882589

Aaron also shared this quote from John Dewey, “We don’t learn from experience…we learn from reflecting on experience.” Again, a practice we want our students to follow. We need to be models of that.

Aaron shared ideas about what to blog about:

♦what you’ve learned & what you’re learning

♦what excites you, scares you, worries you, drives you, etc.

♦a great day or awful day that your learned from

♦what seems obvious

♦what gets overlooked

Other things to consider when blogging are: keeping a list and making some quick notes right away, putting time on the calendar to make blogging happen, and not getting bogged down in the editing process.

Instead, write it, skim it, and share it.

Develop a habit. Carve out time, but let it be organic. Write when it’s reflective. Just “Push Publish!”

Thank you, Aaron, for a great session.

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